Useful Knowledge Written by Others

  1. Book Review: Innovation and Entrepreneurship, by Peter Drucker (.docx)

  2. Book Review: Years of Poverty Years of Plenty, by Greg Duncan (.docx)

  3. The Self-Sufficiency Imperative: Back to Our Roots, by Karl Pnazak (.docx)

  4. Book Review: Poverty Knowledge: Social Science, Social Policy and the Poor in Twentieth-Century U. S. History, by Alice O'Conner (.docx)

  5. Book Review: The Capitalist Revolution, by Peter Berger (.docx)

  6. Reduce World Poverty by 50% by the year 2015? Muhammad Yunus and the Grameen Bank (.docx)

  7. APHSA Interviews with Barbara Blum and Jule Sugarman (.docx) [APHSA = American Public Human Services Association]

  8. “Multivariate analysis indicates that economic elites and organized groups representing business interests have substantial independent impacts on U.S. government policy, while average citizens and mass-based interest groups have little or no independent influence. The results provide substantial support for theories of Economic-Elite Domination and for theories of Biased Pluralism, but not for theories of Majoritarian Electoral Democracy or Majoritarian Pluralism.” Prof. Peritz describes the relative influence of groups on policy making by Congress: https://scholar.princeton.edu/sites/default/files/mgilens/files/gilens_and_page_2014_-testing_theories_of_american_politics.doc.pdf

  9. BRAITHWAIT & McCANN LIVING HISTORY - An Open Letter to Community Action: See https://youtu.be/IjD8DXipss0

  10. "Intermittent Journaling" by Richard Sumpter (January 2021). "The overarching concept that runs through a lot of my thinking is community and the individual. This has a basis in religion, politics, and social studies. When we look at church, government and society they all wrestle with the balance between rights and responsibilities inherent in the individual and the community. Contact richardsumpter@yahoo.com" -- Richard Sumpter

  11. John Johnston's paper on How to Create Systemic Change (August 10, 2020)

  12. Blog by Allen Stansbury: America's New Working Poor: The Decline of the Middle Class Allen Stansbury has started an excellent new blog about America’s new working poor and the decline of the middle class. His work will explore income disparity in the US, and the international ranking of the US in key areas. Recall the fable of the frog. When placed in a pot of cold water that is slowly heated to boiling – the frog dies before realizing what is happening. The same is true for working Americans. They are failing to notice that their economy has been in a slow, evolving process where the US middle class is losing income and assets. The American Dream is being eroded.

    This blog is for those who work in the war against poverty. You are experiencing new participants in your programs. These are America’s new working poor, and the former US middle class, who were rarely out of work. Most of them are educated, and would like to get back to their lives if they could get a job. However, they now must rely on unemployment checks, food banks, and other poverty programs.

    Like all good bloggers, Allen has a point-of-view. You may or may not agree with him on every specific conclusion, but I think you will agree with most of his findings that show that both the middle class and the working poor are in serious trouble in this country. You are welcome to post your comments at each section of this blog.

    Unlike most blogs, Allen’s information is heavily documented. Where possible the blog posts are taken directly from source material that will be useful to you and your organization. Every day, there is new information being published on the decline of America’s middle class. The blog site will post new information as it comes available.

    The blog is located at
    http://declineofusmiddleclass.blogspot.com/